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London’s Green Line Coach Services

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Pre-war coach T 219

Since the late 1920s, various operators have run luxury coach services from the outer suburbs into central London. These were luxury in the sense that they were usually better fitted with upholstered seats and ran at regular intervals and at a higher average speed than the motor buses. (The latter were often anything but luxurious, with hard wooden seats and had no roofs against the elements on the upper deck.) They also ran to a published timetable, and did not require prebooking of seats.

Gradually these independent coach operators were bought out by the London General Omnibus Company (LGOC), which rebranded all such routes under the name “Green Line” — they also registered the names “Red Line”, “Yellow Line” and “Blue Line”, though they never used them. The LGOC became the main road component of London Transport, which continued to run the services and developed more.

This section gives a brief history of the Green Line operations, the routes and some of the coaches used. I have included lists of detailed changes in the services provided for a small number of them (mostly those that went into Kent); you can see how, over the years, the routes were tinkered with, or massively changed.

Initially the routes terminated in central London, but later, in the early 1930s, pairs were joined so that they crossed from one side of the city to the other. This eased congestion in the centre and allowed Ecclestone Bridge, Victoria to become an important interchange point, as many of them ran through there. Most of the routes from east London terminated at Aldgate, as they were not permitted to ‘clutter up’ the streets of the City. I have provided a number of maps of the early services, which also show all the major towns serviced.

See also my page devoted to London buses; and the pages on Trams and Trolleybuses, Railways in Britain, London Underground, Railways abroad and another on Aircraft and Airports. The main transport page has details.

Green Line Coach Services

Green Line is one of the most successful public transport brands in Britain — and has survived the upheaval and legislative change of many successive Transport Acts — despite having abandoned most of the services for which it was famous!

The London General Omnibus Company (LGOC) was a pioneer in the field of excursions to the countryside at weekends before the First World War. It made sense to utilise the vehicles that would be otherwise idle — but soon, daily services were running from central London to destinations such as Westerham, Windsor, St. Albans, Wormley and Epping Forest, which were extremely remote from the bustle of London at the time. War-time shortage and requisition of transport put an end to the services, and they didn’t resume until the turn of the decade. By 1930, over 30 daily services formed a radiating pattern to almost every principal town within a 30-mile radius of the capital.

The General didn’t have it all to themselves, and a large number of competitive services began to clog the streets of central London. It seems incredible that buses alone could cause traffic congestion! The Metropolitan police were strict and insisted on absolute control over service licensing in central London, but the 1924 London Traffic Act did not cover the outer London Traffic Area (up to 25 miles radius from Charing Cross). The way was therefore open for coaches to operate as short-stage carriages into London from this area, and a large number of ‘pirate’ services started up at this time. Examples are:

  • New Empress Saloons: Wood Green — Southend (1927)
  • Redcar Services: Tunbridge Wells — Victoria (1927)
  • Birch Brothers: Kings Cross — Hitchin — Bedford (1928)
  • Baldock Motor Transport: Baldock — Hitchin — Stevenage — KIngs Cross (1928)
  • Strawhatter Coaches: Luton — Central London Road Transport Station (1928)
  • Hillman Saloon Coaches: Stratford — Brentwood — Chelmsford — Colchester (1928-31)
  • East Surrey: Reigate/Redhill — Charing Cross (1928)
  • LGOC: Watford — Golders Green (1929)

Coach Stop

The next step was the registration of Green Line Coaches Limited on 9th July 1930. Within weeks, new services started running to Guildford, Brentwood, Sunningdale, Maidenhead, Ascot, Tring, Welwyn and Harpenden. Many of these were operated by National and East Surrey on their behalf — but branded Green Line. Many more were proposed but not implemented. On Christmas Day the new coach station at Poland Street was opened to answer criticism from the police that excessive congestion was caused by coaches laying over in central London — also remedied by linking pairs of routes into through services. 25 vehicles per hour were passing through Poland Street at this time. There soon started a desperate race to get services operating before the cut-off date of 9th February 1931 — after which the Traffic Commissioners would grant a license only if a need for a service was demonstrated.

From February, the use of letters to distinguish coach routes started — carried on the route boards and publicity material — often taking the initial letter of the destination, such as:

  • A: Ascot — Dartford
  • B: Brentwood — Charing Cross
  • D: Dorking — Poland Street
  • H: Harpenden — Great Bookham
  • R: Reigate — Hitchin
  • W: Watford — Charing Cross

TF 77 Coach
Pre-war Coach Blind
Pre-war Coach Blind

There now began a process whereby the competitors were systematically absorbed or driven off the road — and thus companies such as Skylark, Bucks Expresses, Regent, Associated Coaches, Blue Belle, Acme Pullman, Red Rover and Queen Line passed into oblivion or concentrated on out-of-town business. In 1933, Green Line was itself absorbed — into the new London Passenger Transport Board. Poland Street coach station was closed, and almost all routes were re-organised into a newly-lettered, cross-London route structure. The new powers granted to the LPTB were put to use in acquiring the businesses of Prices Super Coaches, Batten’s Luxurious, Premier Line, Hillman, Upminster, West London, Sunset Saloon, Strawhatter, Fleet Transport and, finally, Tilbury Coaching. The remaining years to the outbreak of World War 2 in 1939 were taken up with recasting the various competitive services into an efficient and carefully-timed network.


LT 1137 Coach, the first attempt at a successful double-decker Green Line coach

With the impending outbreak of War, all services were summarily withdrawn, and buses were substituted on sections of route which thereby lost all service. The vehicles — all single-deck coaches — were immediately converted to ambulances by removing seats and installing stretcher racks. They were positioned ready to evacuate hospitals in case of air-raids. History shows that the raids did not come for nearly a year, and the folly of having such a huge fleet of vehicles standing idle became apparent. When bombing began to disrupt rail transport more severly, the flexible nature of the Green Line network became apparent. Slowly, services built up again, often run by red buses! By September 1942, fuel and rubber shortages resulted in the suspension of services once again, and many redundant vehicles went into the bus fleet. Others became mobile canteens for the US Army abroad, and a dozen never returned.

When services resumed in February 1946, it was obvious that the pre-war system was not going to be restored. Hitchin and Chertsey were linked for the first time, and services were numbered in a new series from 700 upwards. By mid-summer, the new services were almost all running, and carrying the new, yellow blind with black lettering. The network was carefully planned to make the best use of the staff shift patterns, with one round, cross-London trip occupying a full shift and including a meal break at the distant end. Loadings were quickly built up, and soon pre-war ridership was restored, but on a vehicle mileage reduced by 20 percent — showing the efficiency gains at work. Virtually all services were worked by single-deck vehicles of Q, TF and 10T10 classes, with utility Daimler double-deckers quickly coming to the high-frequency, short routes from the East end into Essex. Services operated for many years with almost no modification apart from attention to the fares tables in 1950 to harmonise the cost of transport modes within Greater London. Passenger journeys rose from 25 million in 1947 to 30 million in 1952 — and later to a peak levels of 36 million in 1957, 1959 and 1960. This was in contrast to the central area where journeys peaked in 1951. New RT type vehicles displaced the utility buses running from Romford garage on routes 721, 722 and 726.

Destination Blind for Route 723

Destination Blind for Route 723

Route 722A E-Plate – route 722 ran from Aldgate via Mile End, Bow, Stratford, Forest Gate, Manor Park, Ilford, Becontree Heath, Romford, Hornchurch and Upminster to Corbets Tey. Route 722A was planned to run from Aldgate to North Romford (Chase Cross), but it was cancelled before service started owing to objections from Central Buses.

In 1951 (Festival of Britain year) the first RF type coaches appeared, and 263 spread throughout the network within 10 months (apart from the East end) where they rapidly set new standards of comfort and reliability. 1953 saw the introduction of the first ‘orbital’ route to the south of London, where loadings quickly built up, as other transport modes did not provide this function. The reshaping of services to serve the New Towns began in 1954. With the ending of fuel rationing as a result of the Suez crisis, private motoring began to increase substantially. From 1960, the story is a sad one of decline.

The first Routemaster coaches appeared in 1962, allocated to the New Town services 715, 716, 718, 719 and 720. Since the new coaches offered greater capacity, there were some reductions in frequency to match. More Routemasters, of the stretched RCL class appeared in 1965. Sadly, neither did anything to revive the network’s flagging fortunes. The new, electric railway services to the East end and Euston marked a major change in the competitive environment. The elderly RF fleet was updated by re-styling and refurbishing from 1965, and the first One-Man-Operated orbital service 724 was introduced in 1966. The orbital routes were the most successful of the many experiments of these years — 724 High Wycombe-Watford-Harlow-Romford; 725 Windsor-Kingston-Croydon-Gravesend; and 727 Crawley-Gatwick Airport-Heathrow-Watford-Luton. Double-manning with conductors was unsustainably expensive, and all the single-deck routes were converted by 1969, often with reduced frequency as well, not a move that attracted passengers — particularly as timekeeping became worse with traffic congestion.

On 1st January 1970, Green Line passed with the country area buses to the National Bus Company. There continued a spiral of decline in which conductors, vehicles and routes were pruned back to the point where the remaining services were unattractive and unviable. New one-man Reliance coaches replaced all the double-deckers from 1972, and RF coaches were swept away by a tide of off-the-peg Leyland Nationals. These were replaced, in turn by ‘proper’ Reliance coaches from 1977 on routes that returned to a radial pattern, which reduced the effect of congestion on timekeeping. Harking back to the ‘orbital’ routes was the introduction of a number of fast JETLINK services which provided useful transfer journeys. Emerging traffic centres such as Thorpe Park and Brent Cross Shopping Centre were served by diversion from established routes. In addition, many services were worked on a seasonal basis, for example to the south coast resorts. In 1979 the last cross-London route finished.

In 1980, the market for coach services of over 30 miles was de-regulated, and Green Line was able to extend its routes to logical termini in good traffic centres such as Cambridge, Oxford, Northampton and Brighton. In addition, commuter journeys were encouraged by starting early-morning services from edge-of-town locations and running via the motorway network to central locations, avoiding tube transfer where possible. Airport links were developed into an important network, with new routes established from Luton to London via Brent Cross (757), Gatwick to Heathrow (747), Gatwick to Victoria (777) and Heathrow to Victoria (767). Also, by association with other National Express operators, Green Line coaches could be found in far-away places like Cardiff, Wolverhampton Manchester, and Southend. In 1989 a new company, Speedlink Airport Services was established (now renamed AirLink), which took over the Flightline and Jetlink brands from the successors of London Country — although still within the same holding group. Now the Speedlink services are owned by National Express.

It is sad to relate that the initiatives such as motorway routing have turned into a disadvantage, now that the London motorway network has turned into a virtual car park at peak hours. Surely, the answer lies in reducing the number of cars using what would otherwise be an excellent network? London Transport has tried to axe the popular Expresslink 726, remnant of the first orbital route, which is popular simply because it cuts across other transport links and enables journeys that would otherwise involve several changes. Fortunately, it survives, operated by Capital Logistics, but now only runs as far as Bromley.

To finish on a political note, Green Line is a brand owned and operated by a group of constituents of the internationally prominent ARRIVA company (previously Cowie). The only local identity to avoid the otherwise all-encompassing turquoise livery, or London variant, is... GREEN LINE. Go to the Green Line web pages and look at the routes, timetables and tours. Let’s look forward to a Centenary celebration, rather than backwards to a less than happy Golden Jubilee.



RCL 2233 Coach on a Bus Service

Classic Green Line Coaches – an AEC RT, Routemaster RCL and a T class single decker

And for me, the most familiar of them all, the RF; this one happens to be on bus duty

The Major Radial Arteries

The following represent the main routes used between the late 1920s and 1980; “see here” means that there is a fairly complete account of the service on this page; “see part here” means that the information only covers a small part of the story of that route.

GRAVESEND – DARTFORD – LONDON (see here)

WROTHAM – Farningham – Swanley – LONDON (see here)

TUNBRIDGE WELLS – Sevenoaks – Green Street Green – Bromley – LONDON (see here)

SEVENOAKS – Westerham – Westerham Hill – Bromley – LONDON (see here)

WESTERHAM – Warlingham – Croydon – Brixton – LONDON (see here)

OXTED – Warlingham – Croydon – Brixton – LONDON (see here)

EAST GRINSTEAD – Godstone – Caterham – Croydon – Brixton – LONDON (see here)

GODSTONE – Caterham-on-the-Hill – Croydon – Brixton – LONDON (see here)

CRAWLEY – Gatwick Airport – Redhill – Croydon – Brixton – LONDON

REIGATE – Sutton – Tooting – LONDON

DORKING – Leatherhead – Epsom – Tooting – LONDON

DORKING – Leatherhead – Chessington – Kingston – Richmond – Hammersmith – LONDON

GUILDFORD – Esher – Roehampton – Hammersmith – Shepherd’s Bush – LONDON

WOKING – Weybridge – Kingston – Richmond – Hammersmith – LONDON

CHERTSEY – Weybridge – Kingston – Richmond – Hammersmith – LONDON

SUNNINGDALE – Virginia Water – Staines – Hounslow – Hammersmith – LONDON (see here)

ASCOT – Virginia Water – Staines – Hounslow – Hammersmith – LONDON (see here)

WINDSOR – Staines – Kingston – Chelsea – LONDON

WINDSOR – Slough – Heathrow Airport – Hammersmith – LONDON (see here)

HIGH WYCOMBE – Beaconsfield – Gerrards X – Uxbridge – Ealing – Shepherd’s B – LONDON

AMERSHAM – Gerrards Cross – Uxbridge – Ealing – Shepherd’s Bush – LONDON

AMERSHAM – Rickmansworth – Northwood – Sudbury – Wembley – LONDON (see here)

CHESHAM – Amersham – Gerrards Cross – Uxbridge – Ealing – Shepherd’s Bush – LONDON

AYLESBURY – Tring – Berkhamsted – Watford – Edgware – Cricklewood – LONDON (see here)

HEMEL HEMPSTEAD – Watford – Stanmore – Willesden – LONDON

HEMEL HEMPSTEAD – Kings Langley – Watford – Edgware – Cricklewood – LONDON (see

part here and part here)

WHIPSNADE ZOO – St Albans – Barnet – Golders Gn – LONDON

DUNSTABLE – St. Albans – Borehamwood – Golders Green – LONDON

LUTON – Harpenden – St. Albans – Borehamwood – Golders Green – LONDON

LUTON – Harpenden – St. Albans – Barnet – LONDON

HITCHIN – Stevenage – Welwyn – Hatfield – Barnet – Golders Green – LONDON

WELWYN GARDEN CITY – Hatfield – Barnet – Golders Green – LONDON (see part here)

STEVENAGE – Welwyn – Hatfield – Barnet – Golders Green – LONDON

HERTFORD – Hoddesdon – Cheshunt – Edmonton – Finsbury Park – LONDON

HERTFORD – Ware – Hoddesdon – Enfield – Finsbury Park – LONDON

BISHOPS STORTFORD – Old Harlow – Epping – Loughton – Stratford – LONDON

HARLOW New Tn – Epping – Loughton – Chingford – Walthamstow – Finsbury Pk – LONDON

HARLOW NEW TOWN – Epping – Loughton – Wanstead – Stratford – LONDON

BRENTWOOD – Romford – Ilford – Stratford – LONDON

HAROLD HILL – Romford – Stratford – LONDON

CORBET’S TEY – Upminster – Hornchurch – Romford – Ilford – Stratford – LONDON (see

part here)

GRAYS – Aveley LCC Estate – Dagenham – Barking – East Ham – LONDON

TILBURY – Grays – Aveley LCC Estate – Dagenham – Barking – East Ham – LONDON

TILBURY – Grays – Aveley – Dagenham – Barking – East Ham – LONDON


And The Main Orbital Routes

GRAVESEND – Dartford – Bromley – West Croydon – Kingston – Staines – WINDSOR (see here)

LUTON – St Albans – Watford Junction – Uxbridge – Heathrow – Reigate – Gatwick – CRAWLEY

Green Line: Major Arteries

TUNBRIDGE WELLS, SEVENOAKS, WESTERHAM, BROMLEY – LONDON and beyond

Service letters or numbers: C, AC, D; C1, C2; 704, 705

1930/06/06
Autocar service (LGOC-sponsored) started TUNBRIDGE WELLS – LONDON (Oxford Circus), in competition with Redcar of Tunbridge Wells and Safeway of Sevenoaks
1930/09/xx
Autocar service TUNBRIDGE WELLS – LONDON (Oxford Circus) transferred to Green Line
1930/10/08
East Surrey service started WESTERHAM – Bromley – LONDON (Oxford Circus)
1930/10/18
Westerham route extended to Sevenoaks
1931/01/14
Sevenoaks service London terminus transferred to Poland Street
1931/01/14
Tunbridge Wells service London terminus transferred to Poland Street
1931/02/21 (Route L)
Route letter allocated, L: TUNBRIDGE WELLS – LONDON (Poland Street Coach Station)
1931/02/21 (Route X)
Route letter allocated, X: SEVENOAKS – Westerham – LONDON (Poland Street Coach Station)
1933/10/03 (many routes)
Poland Street Coach Station closed after this day. Most Green Line services diverted from Central London in accordance with Amulree Committee rulings. Main London stopping place at Eccleston Bridge, Victoria
1933/10/04
Route lettering scheme introduced:
C: Chertsey – London – Tunbridge Wells
AC: Woking – London – Tunbridge Wells
D: Sevenoaks – Westerham – London – Sunbury Common
1933/11
Additional boarding points authorized on all routes
1935/07/31 (Route C)
Additional service operated Tunbridge Wells – Victoria following acquisition from Maidstone & District of former Redcar service
1936/01/08 (Route C/C1)
Service C redesignated C1
1936/01/08 (Route AC/C2)
Service AC redesignated C2, and revised to run daily Tunbridge Wells – Victoria – Woking thus integrating former Redcar service
1936/03/04 (Route D)
Terminal in Sevenoaks changed to Bligh’s Meadow Car Park (Bus Station)
1938/02/09 (Route D)
Withdrawn between Sevenoaks and Westerham
1939/09/25
New Country Bus routes introduced to cover the bus fare sections of withdrawn coach routes and also maintain a link with Tunbridge Wells. It is probable that some journeys over at least part of these routes had been operated by unnumbered routes from soon after the coaches’ withdrawal:
403D: Sevenoaks – Tunbridge Wells (replacing C1 and C2)
1940/03/13 (Route C1/C)
Service C1 reinstated and redesignated C
1940/10/23 (Route C)
Routes crossing London split into two sections, each terminating at Victoria
1940/12/04 (all routes)
Revised network of numbered services introduced, all terminating in central London. The numbers were alloted to avoid duplication of Central Bus routes serving the same roads:
5: Tunbridge Wells – Victoria (replacing C1)
20: Chertsey – Victoria (replacing C1)
1940/12/18 (all routes)
Further routes reinstated:
21 (originally advertised as route 25): Staines – Kingston – Victoria (replacing D)
1942/09/29 (all routes)
Last day of operation in war time of Green Line coaches. In order to place restrictions on unnecessary travel and to conserve fuel and rubber, all Green Line coaches were withdrawn after this date for the duration of the war.
1946/03/06 (Route 704)
Service started 704: TUNBRIDGE WELLS (Coach Station) – Tonbridge – Hildenborough – Sevenoaks – Knockholt Station – Farnborough – Bromley – Catford – Lewisham – New Cross – Elephant & Castle – London (Victoria) – Kensington – Hammersmith – Great West Road – Turnham Green – Osterley – Cranford – London (Heathrow) Airport – Colnbrook – Langley – Slough – Eton – WINDSOR (Bus Station)
1946/05/29 (Route 705)
Service started 705: SEVENOAKS (Bus Station) – Brasted – Westerham – Biggin Hill – Keston – Bromley – Catford – Lewisham – New Cross – Elephant & Castle – London (Victoria) – Kensington – Hammersmith – Great West Road – Turnham Green – Osterley – Cranford – London (Heathrow) Airport – Colnbrook – Langley – Slough – Eton – WINDSOR (Bus Station)
1951/10/01 (Route 704)
10T10 to RF (TW [Tunbridge Wells])
1951/11/07–14 (Route 704)
10T10 to RF (WR [Windsor])
1952/06/01 (Route 705)
10T10 to RF (DG [Dunton Green] and WR [Windsor])
1953/06/02 (many routes)
Coronation Day — many routes split in London, several to finish at off-route terminals
1958/05/05 (all routes)
Bus strike started
1958/10/15 (Route 705)
Diverted to serve Hayes (Kent)
1959/09/27 (many routes)
Eccleston Bridge completely closed for reconstruction; all coaches diverted via Elizabeth Bridge until 1961/05/03
1961/05/03 (many routes)
Coaches resumed using Eccleston Bridge following reconstruction started 1959/09/27
1963/08/23 (Route 705)
Operated ‘Express’ between Victoria and Windsor with only 13 intermediate stops on this section; diverted via Chiswick Flyover and Colnbrook By-Pass
1965/09/26 (many routes)
Victoria area one-way traffic scheme made Eccleston Bridge one way northbound; southbound coaches stop in Buckingham Palace Road
Before 1967/02 (Routes 704 and 705)
RF to RCL
1967/12/01 (Routes 704 and 705)
Last day of express operation of route 705; route operates as 704 between Victoria and Windsor
1970/01/01 (all routes)
Under the Transport (London) Act, 1969, the Country Bus and Coach section of London Transport passed to a new company, London Country Bus Services, a subsidiary of the National Bus Company.
1970/04/13 (Routes 704 and 705)
Diverted away from Eton due to closure of Windsor Bridge
1971/07/04 (Routes 704 and 705)
Extended from Windsor Bus Station to Windsor Safari Park on summer Sundays
1972/03/25 (Routes 704 and 705)
Converted to O.M.O.
1977/05/21 (Route 704)
Diverted to double-run via Heathrow Airport Central; certain Sunday journeys diverted to operate via Knockholt Pound
1977/05/21 (Route 705)
Diverted to double-run via Heathrow Airport Central; certain journeys diverted to double-run to Chartwell (except Mondays and Fridays)
1977/09/25 (Routes 704 and 705)
Last day of operation to Windsor Safari Park
1978/05/21 (Route 705)
Revised to operate on Sundays only between Windsor Bus Station and Tunbridge Wells via Westerham with certain journeys double-running to Chartwell during the summer. Rerouted away from Hayes (Kent) to serve Bromley Common
1979/04/28 (Route 704)
Revised to operate between Windsor Bus Station and Victoria
1979/04/29 (Route 705)
Revised to operate on Sundays only between Windsor Bus Station and Tunbridge Wells West Station via Westerham with certain journeys double-running to Chartwell during the summer

Green Line Coach 724


Route 724 E-Plate

This route ran from Romford to Staines via Abridge, Epping, Harlow, Hertford, Hatfield, Welwyn Garden City, St. Albans, Watford, Rickmansworth, Uxbridge and Heathrow Airport. It had previously run to High Wycombe instead of Staines, but was rerouted in the early 1970s with the growth of travel to Heathrow Airport. The 724 survives as the last remnant of the “’round-London” routes introduced in the 1950s (725, later 725/726: Gravesend – Windsor; now X26 Croydon – Heathrow) and 1960 (724 and 727: Luton – Heathrow – Crawley).It was operated by RF coaches, subsequently RPs and later Leyland Nationals. It was once a major link and remains alive and well, operating daily with coaches hourly (2-hourly on Sundays) between Harlow and Heathrow.

Green Line Coach 725


Route 725 E-Plate

This route ran between Gravesend (Clock Tower) and Windsor Bus Station, but, unlike most Green Line coach routes which ran though central London, this took a circular route via Northfleet, Dartford, Bexley, Sidcup, Chislehurst, Bromley, Beckenham, Croydon, Wallington, Sutton, Cheam, Worcester Park, Kingston, Hampton Court, Sunbury, Ashford, Staines, Egham and Englefield Green. The route was worked from Northfleet [NF] and Windsor [WR] garages.

Green Line Coach 726


Route 726 E-Plate

Route 726 E-Plate

This route was originally a summer-only route which ran between Romford and Whipsnade Zoo via Chadwell Heath, Ilford, Stratford, Aldgate, Baker Street, Finchley, Golders Green, Barnet and St, Albans. In the early 1960s it was extended in the east to Harold Hill Estate for a few summers. By 1964 it had become a limited stop service runing via the M1 and Edgware instead of St. Albans and Barnet, but nonetheless could not compete with the private motorcar and disappeared before the end of the decade.

The 726 was re-introduced in the late 1970s as part of the 725 rerouted via Heathrow Airport. It ran from Gravesend to Windsor with route 725 via Northfleet, Dartford, Bexley, Sidcup, Chislehurst, Bromley, Beckenham, Croydon, Wallington, Sutton, Cheam, Worcester Park, Kingston and Hampton Court, then diverted via Feltham, Heathrow Airport and Slough.

During the revamp of the network in the 1970s and 1980s route 726 was proposed for withdrawal. However, most of the route, now withdrawn between Dartford and Gravesend and between Heathrow Airport and Windsor, ran within Greater London, and London Transport decided to put the route out to tender and retain its operation within the London area, still retaining the established “Green Line” marketing name. It became operated by Luton & District and ran daily between Dartford and Heathrow Airport via Bexley, Sidcup, Chislehurst, Bromley, Croydon, Sutton, Kingston, Hampton Court, Feltham and Hatton Cross. The route has since been progressively cut back to Bromley and more recently was curtailed at Croydon, and now remains as route X26 between Croydon and Heathrow Airport, rerouted away from Hampton Court. The 726 was the only Green Line route put out to tender by London Transport.

Green Line: Recommended Books

Green Line 1930 – 1980 by D W K Jones and B J Davis (London Country Bus Services Ltd.)

Glory Days – Green Line 1930 by Kevin McCormack (Ian Allan Publishing)

Green Line Coach Guide, 1938 (London Transport) [I found this on a book-seller’s web; full timetables, fares, lists of boarding points, town plans and a complete fold-out route map, 314 pages; original price ‘twopence’!]

RF by Ken Glazier (Capital Transport Publishing), and other books in the same series, like RT, Routemaster; see here

Green Line: Recommended Web Sites

Ian Smith’s Bus Stop, an indispensible guide to London’s road transport

A tribute to Chelsham Garage, routes, buses, coaches, etc.

A comprehensive bibliography of books about London buses, etc.

Today’s Green Line web-site

Green Line: Major Arteries

GRAVESEND – DARTFORD – LONDON and beyond; GRAVESEND – DARTFORD – CROYDON and beyond

Service letters or numbers: A, AA; A1, A2; 2; 701, 702, 725, 722, 726

1930/07/23
[LGOC service started SUNNINGDALE – Virginia Water – Staines – Hounslow – Hammersmith – LONDON (Charing Cross)]
1930/09/01
[LGOC service started ASCOT – Virginia Water – Staines – Hounslow – Hammersmith – LONDON (Oxford Circus)]
1930/10/01
[LGOC Ascot and Sunningdale routes transferred to Green Line]
1930/11/29
[Ascot and Sunningdale routes diverted via Ashford and Feltham; London terminus is Charing Cross]
1931/01/11
[Ascot and Sunningdale routes – London terminus transferred to Poland Street]
1931/01/28
Ascot and Sunningdale services diverted away from Syon Lane and Great West Road to run via Brentford High Street; service extended across London via Northumberland Avenue (westbound) and Great Scotland Yard (eastbound) to DARTFORD
1931/02/21
Route letter A allocated: ASCOT or SUNNINGDALE – Virginia Water – Staines – Ashford – Hammersmith – London – Blackheath – Welling – DARTFORD
1933/07/01 (Route A)
Ascot and Sunningdale services extended to GRAVESEND (Denton)
1933/10/03 (many routes)
Poland Street Coach Station closed after this day. Most Green Line services diverted from Central London in accordance with Amulree Committee rulings. Main London stopping place at Eccleston Bridge, Victoria
1933/10/04 (all routes)
New route lettering scheme introduced:
A: ASCOT – Virginia Water – Staines – Ashford – Hammersmith – London – Blackheath – Welling – Dartford – GRAVESEND (Denton)
AA: SUNNINGDALE – Virginia Water – Staines – Ashford – Hammersmith – London – Blackheath – Welling – Dartford – GRAVESEND (Denton)
1933/11 (all routes)
Additional boarding points authorized on all routes
1934/09/26 (Routes A, AA)
Curtailed at GRAVESEND Clock Tower
1935/07/03 (Routes A, A1, AA, A2)
Service A redesignated A1; service AA redesignated A2
1937/05/02 (Routes A1, A2)
Diverted between Northfleet and Gravesend to run via London Road and Overcliffe
1939/09/01 (all routes)
Green Line coaches withdrawn for immediate conversion into public ambulances; all routes suspended
1940/01/17 (Routes A1, A2)
Service reinstated
1940/10/23 (Routes A1, A2)
Routes crossing London split into two sections, each terminating at VICTORIA
1940/12/04 (all routes)
Revised network of numbered services introduced, all terminating in central London. The numbers were alloted to avoid duplication of Central Bus routes serving the same roads
2: Gravesend – Victoria (replacing A1 and A2)
23: Ascot – Victoria (replacing A1)
23A: Sunningdale – Victoria (replacing A2)
1942/09/29 (all routes)
Last day of operation in war time of Green Line coaches. In order to place restrictions on unnecessary travel and to conserve fuel and rubber, all Green Line coaches were withdrawn after this date for the duration of the war
1946/06/19 (Route 702)
Service 702 started: GRAVESEND (Clock Tower) – Northfleet – Dartford – Crayford – Bexleyheath – Welling – Blackheath – New Cross – Elephant & Castle – LONDON (Victoria) – Kensington – Hammersmith – Turnham Green – Brentford – Hounslow – Bedfont – Staines – Egham – Virginia Water – SUNNINGDALE Station
1946/06/22 (Route 701)
Service 701 started: GRAVESEND (Clock Tower) – Northfleet – Dartford – Crayford – Bexleyheath – Welling – Blackheath – New Cross – Elephant & Castle – LONDON (Victoria) – Kensington – Hammersmith – Turnham Green – Brentford – Hounslow – Bedfont – Staines – Egham – Virginia Water – ASCOT (Horse & Groom)
1952/02/12-19 (Routes 701, 702)
Converted from 10T10 to RF (ST [Staines])
1952/03/01 (Routes 701, 702)
Converted from 10T10 to RF (NF [Northfleet])
1953/06/02 (many routes)
Coronation Day: many routes split in London, several to finish at off-route terminals
1953/07/01 (Route 725)
New hourly service 725 started: GRAVESEND (Clock Tower) – Northfleet – Dartford – Crayford – Bexley – Sidcup – Chislehurst – Bromley – Beckenham – Elmers End – West Croydon – Wallington – Sutton – Cheam – New Malden – Kingston – Hampton Court – Sunbury – Staines – Egham – Englefield Green – WINDSOR (Bus Station)
1954/04/28 (Route 725)
Extra half-hourly service Dartford – Windsor introduced (using RFs from DT [Dartford])
1956/12/17 (Route 725)
Suez Crisis: fuel emergency led to service reductions
1957/04/01 (Route 725)
Suez Crisis: fuel emergency ceased and full service restored
1958/05/05 (all routes)
Bus strike started
1958/06/20 (all routes)
Bus strike ended
1959/09/27 (many routes)
Eccleston Bridge completely closed for reconstruction; all coaches diverted via Elizabeth Bridge
1961/05/03 (many routes)
Coaches resumed using Eccleston Bridge following reconstruction started 1959/09/27
1963/11/18 (Route 722)
Route 722: Extended from Corbets Tey to DARTFORD; route: DARTFORD – Dartford Tunnel – Aveley – Corbets Tey – Upminster – Hornchurch – Romford – Becontree Heath – Ilford – Manor Park – Forest Gate – Stratford – Mile End – LONDON (Aldgate)
1964/11/04 (Route 722)
Withdrawn between Corbets Tey and Dartford
1964/11/04 (Route 725)
Diverted to serve Ashford Town Centre
1965/09/26 (many routes)
Victoria area one-way traffic scheme made Eccleston Bridge one way northbound; southbound coaches stop in Buckingham Palace Road
1965/11/01 (Route 701)
Route split in London on Monday to Friday to run Ascot – Victoria and Hammersmith – Gravesend
1965/11/01 (Route 702)
Route split in London on Monday to Friday to run Sunningdale – Victoria and Hammersmith – Gravesend
1967/08/12 (Route 702)
Withdrawn on Saturdays between Sunningdale and Victoria
1967/10/07 (Route 702)
Reinstated on Saturdays between Sunningdale and Victoria
1967/12/30 (Route 701)
Extended in Ascot to Heatherwood Hospital
1968/05/18 (Route 701)
Monday to Friday through service reinstated
1968/05/18 (Route 702)
Monday to Friday Victoria – Sunningdale service operated during peak hours only
1968/11/23 (Routes 701, 702)
Converted to O.M.O.
1969/02/15 (Route 725)
Converted to O.M.O.
1970/01/01 (all routes)
Under the Transport (London) Act, 1969, the Country Bus and Coach section of London Transport passed to a new company, London Country Bus Services, a subsidiary of the National Bus Company
1971/02/20 (Route 702)
Curtailed to operate Sunningdale – Victoria (Monday to Friday peaks only), Saturday and Sunday service (Gravesend – Sunningdale) withdrawn
1973/07/06 (Route 702)
Last day of operation
1974/09/07 (Route 701)
Converted from RF to SNC (NF, ST)
1975/10/03 (Route 701)
Last day of operation
1977/05/21 (Route 726)
New service as 725 but diverted at Ashford via Heathrow Airport thence non-stop to Windsor via M4 motorway
1978/10/28 (Route 725)
Rerouted to serve Bexleyheath
? [in operation 1982/04/15] (Route 755)
Route 755: CRAWLEY – West Croydon – Bexleyheath – GRAVESEND
? [1982/05/xx] (Route 755)
Withdrawn between West Croydon and Gravesend
1987/01/11 (all routes)
Travelcards and Capitalcards (covering a minimum of two zones) valid on Green Line services within Greater London

Green Line: Major Arteries

WROTHAM (and district) – Farningham – Swanley – LONDON and beyond

Service letters or numbers: I; B; 478, 3; 703, 717, 719

1931/01/28
East Surrey service started, FARNINGHAM – LONDON (Poland Street Coach Station)
1931/01/31
[Green Line service started RICKMANSWORTH – Harrow – Wembley – LONDON (Poland Street Coach Station)]
1931/02/21 (Route I)
Route letter allocated, FARNINGHAM – LONDON (Poland Street Coach Station)
1931/02/21 (Route P)
[Route letter allocated RICKMANSWORTH – LONDON (Poland Street Coach Station)]
1933/07/01 (Route I)
Extended to WROTHAM
1933/10/03
Poland Street Coach Station closed after this day. Most Green Line services diverted from Central London in accordance with Amulree Committee rulings. Main London stopping place at Eccleston Bridge, Victoria
1933/10/04 (Route B)
Route lettering scheme introduced:
B: Wrotham – London – Rickmansworth
1933/11
Additional boarding points authorized on all routes
1934/01/17 (Route S)
[West London Coaches acquired, service S: Victoria Coach Station – Rickmansworth – Amersham – Aylesbury with connecting shuttle service Amersham – Chesham]
1934/07/13 (Route S)
[Last day of operation]
1934/07/14 (Route B)
Service extended from Rickmansworth to Amersham, with alternate journeys continuing to either Aylesbury or Chesham
1936/01/08 (Route B)
Chesham journeys diverted at Amersham to continue on main route to Wendover
1939/09/01 (all routes)
Green Line coaches withdrawn for immediate conversion into public ambulances; all routes suspended (Romford garage may have operated for a day or two longer)
1939/09/25
New Country Bus routes introduced to cover the bus fare sections of withdrawn coach routes and also maintain a link with Tunbridge Wells. It is probable that some journeys over at least part of these routes had been operated by unnumbered routes from soon after the coaches’ withdrawal:
[393 Amersham – Great Missenden (replacing B)]
478 Swanley – Wrotham (replacing B)
1940/12/04 (all routes)
Revised network of numbered services introduced, all terminating in central London. The numbers were alloted to avoid duplication of Central Bus routes serving the same roads:
3 Wrotham – Victoria (replacing B)
[35 Aylesbury – Rickmansworth – Victoria (replacing B)]
1942/09/29 (all routes)
Last day of operation in war time of Green Line coaches. In order to place restrictions on unnecessary travel and to conserve fuel and rubber, all Green Line coaches were withdrawn after this date for the duration of the war
1946/04/03 (Route 703)
Service started 703: WROTHAM (The Square) – West Kingsdown – Farningham – Swanley – Sidcup – Eltham – Lewisham – New Cross – Elephant & Castle – LONDON (Victoria) – Marble Arch – Harrow Road – Harlesden – Wembley – Sudbury – Harrow-on-the-Hill – North Harrow – Pinner – Northwood – Rickmansworth – Chorleywood – Chalfont & Latimer Station – AMERSHAM (Garage)
1947 Spring (Route 703)
Test of LTC coaches on route
1952/06/07-09 (Route 703)
Converted from 10T10 to RF (SJ [Swanley])
1952/06/11 (Route 703)
Converted from 10T10 to RF (MA [Amersham])
1953/06/02 (many routes)
Coronation Day — many routes split in London, several to finish at off-route terminals
1958/05/05 (all routes)
Bus strike started
1958/06/20 (all routes)
Bus strike ended
1959/09/27 (many routes)
Eccleston Bridge completely closed for reconstruction; all coaches diverted via Elizabeth Bridge until 1961/05/03
1961/05/03 (many routes)
Coaches resumed using Eccleston Bridge following reconstruction started 1959/09/27
1963 (Route 703)
London – Amersham withdrawn
1964/11/03 (Route 703)
Last day of operation
1964/11/04 (Route 717)
Extended from Victoria to Wrotham, replacing 703 with RMC (SJ, HF [Hatfield]); route: WROTHAM (The Square) – West Kingsdown – Farningham – Swanley – Sidcup – Eltham – Lewisham – New Cross – Elephant & Castle – LONDON (Victoria) – Marble Arch – Baker Street – Golders Green – North Finchley – Barnet – Potters Bar – Welham Green – South Hatfield – Hatfield – WELWYN GARDEN CITY (Cole Green Lane)
1965/09/26 (many routes)
Victoria area one-way traffic scheme made Eccleston Bridge one way northbound; southbound coaches stop in Buckingham Palace Road
1967/12/02 (Route 717)
Curtailed to operate between Wrotham and Baker Street Station only
1968/11/22 (Route 717)
Last day of operation
1968/11/23 (Route 719)
Converted to O.M.O. and extended from Victoria to Wrotham to replace 717; route: WROTHAM (The Square) – West Kingsdown – Farningham – Swanley – Sidcup – Eltham – Lewisham – New Cross – Elephant & Castle – LONDON (Victoria) – Marble Arch – Kilburn – Willesden – Neasden – Kingsbury – Stanmore – Bushey – Watford – Garston – Leverstock Green – HEMEL HEMPSTEAD (Bus Station)
1970/01/01 (all routes)
Under the Transport (London) Act, 1969, the Country Bus and Coach section of London Transport passed to a new company, London Country Bus Services, a subsidiary of the National Bus Company
1978/04/01 (Route 719)
Revised to operate between Hemel Hempstead and East Grinstead via Kingsbury – Victoria thence via former service 708
1978/04/01 (Route 729)
New service: Victoria – Borough Green, Monday to Friday peak hours only, replacing 719
1978/04/16 (Route 739)
New service: Victoria – Brands Hatch operating on major race days only

Green Line: Major Arteries

WESTERHAM, OXTED, CROYDON – LONDON and beyond

Service letters or numbers: H, AH, BH, J, K, T, U, AU; E, F, G, H1, H2, H3; 706, 707, 708, 709, 719

1930/09/29
East Surrey service started GODSTONE GREEN – Whyteleafe – Croydon – LONDON (Oxford Circus)
1930/10/22
East Surrey service started OXTED – Chelsham – Croydon – LONDON (Oxford Circus)
1930/11/12
East Surrey service started EAST GRINSTEAD – Caterham on the Hill – Croydon – LONDON (Oxford Circus)
1930/12/06
Oxted route extended to EDENBRIDGE
1931/01/xx
Godstone service London terminus transferred to Poland Street
1931/01/14
Edenbridge service London terminus transferred to Poland Street
1931/01/14
East Grinstead service diverted via Whyteleafe; London terminus transferred to Poland Street
1931/01/14
Cross-London service, GODSTONE GREEN – Caterham on the Hill – Oxford Circus – TRING
1931/01/14
Service started CATERHAM – Coulsdon – Croydon – Oxford Circus – Bushey — HEMEL HEMPSTEAD, without stops in Watford
1931/02/21 (Route J)
Route letter allocated, J: EDENBRIDGE – Chelsham – LONDON (Poland Street Coach Station)
1931/02/21 (Route K)
Route letter allocated, K: CATERHAM – London (Oxford Circus) – HEMEL HEMPSTEAD
1931/02/21 (Route T)
Route letter allocated, T: GODSTONE GREEN – London (Oxford Circus) – AYLESBURY
1931/02/21 (Route U)
Route letter allocated, U: EAST GRINSTEAD – LONDON (Poland Street Coach Station)
1932/07/20 (Route AU)
Blue Belle Motors Ltd. acquired: service AU: EAST GRINSTEAD – LONDON (Paddington, Sprint Street)
1933/10/03 (many routes)
Poland Street Coach Station closed after this day. Most Green Line services diverted from Central London in accordance with Amulree Committee rulings. Main London stopping place at Eccleston Bridge, Victoria
1933/11
Additional boarding points authorized on all routes
1934/02/21 (Routes E and F)
Routes E and F diverted at Bushey away from Aldenham Road and Watford by-pass to run via Watford High Street
1934/04/25 (Route H)
Route diverted away from Lingfield via Eastbourne Road
1934/04/25 (Route AH)
Route diverted between Lingfield and East Grinstead via Baldwin’s Hill
1934/04/27 (Route AH)
Beaumont Safeway Coaches London — Dunstable service acquired without apparent alteration to service AH
1934/07/14 (Route E)
Service extended from Tring to Aylesbury but curtailed at Chelsham apart from odd journeys to Tatsfield
1934/07/14 (Route F)
Alternate journeys extended from Chelsham to Edenbridge, the other alternate journey continued to Tatsfield
1936/01/08 (Route H/H1)
Service H redesignated H1, diverted to serve Lingfield; also diverted away from Elstree to serve Borehamwood and Barnet by-pass
1936/01/08 (Route AH/H2)
Service AH redesignated H2
1936/07/29 (Route BH/H3)
Service BH redesignated H3
1936/08/30 (Route G)
Garage journeys to work in service with 1d. fares, Godstone – Caterham
1937/05/02 (Route G)
Extended from Horse Guards Avenue to Windsor via Slough; diverted between Purley and Thornton Heath via Purley Way to serve Croydon Airport
1939/09/01 (all routes)
Green Line coaches withdrawn for immediate conversion into public ambulances; all routes suspended. (Romford garage may have operated for a day or two longer)
1939/09/25
New Country Bus routes introduced to cover the bus fare sections of withdrawn coach routes. It is probable that some journeys over at least part of these routes had been operated by unnumbered routes from soon after the coaches’ withdrawal:
[369: St. Albans – Dunstable (replacing H2)]
403C: Warlingham – Tatsfield (replacing F)
465: Warlingham – Edenbridge (replacing F)
1940/02/07 (Route H1)
[Service reinstated between Luton and Victoria only]
1940/03/13 (Route E)
[Service reinstated between Aylesbury and Victoria only]
1940/03/13 (Route F)
[Service reinstated between Hemel Hempstead and Victoria only]
1940/03/13 (Route H1/H)
Service H1 extended through to East Grinstead and redesignated H
1940/10/23 (Route H)
Routes crossing London split into two sections, each terminating at Victoria
1940/12/04 (all routes)
Revised network of numbered services introduced, all terminating in central London. The numbers were alloted to avoid duplication of Central Bus routes serving the same roads:
8: East Grinstead – Victoria (replacing H1)
40: Aylesbury – Tring – Victoria (replacing E)
40A: Hemel Hempstead – Victoria (replacing F)
40B: Watford (Leavesden Rd Garage) – Victoria (replacing I and J); [there is some doubt as to whether this service actually ran at all – in any case, it was withdrawn after 1940/12/17]
45: Luton – Radlett – Victoria (replacing H1)
46: Luton – Barnet – Victoria (replacing H3)
1940/12/18 (all routes)
Further routes reinstated:
26: 26 Windsor – Slough – Victoria (replacing G)
1942/09/29 (all routes)
Last day of operation in war time of Green Line coaches. In order to place restrictions on unnecessary travel and to conserve fuel and rubber, all Green Line coaches were withdrawn after this date for the duration of the war.
1946/05/01 (Route 708)
Service started 708: EAST GRINSTEAD (King Street) – Lingfield – Godstone – Caterham – Whyteleafe – Purley – Croydon – Thornton Heath Pond – Streatham – Brixton – Stockwell – London (Victoria) – Marble Arch – Kilburn – Cricklewood – Colindale – Edgware – Stanmore – Bushey – Watford – Kings Langley – Two Waters – HEMEL HEMPSTEAD (Bus Station)
1946/06/26 (Route 706)
Service started 706: WESTERHAM Station – Tatsfield – Chelsham – Sanderstead – Warlingham – Selsdon – Croydon – Thornton Heath Pond – Streatham – Brixton – Stockwell – London (Victoria) – Marble Arch – Kilburn – Cricklewood – Colindale – Edgware – Stanmore – Bushey – Watford – Kings Langley – Two Waters – Berkhamsted – Tring – AYLESBURY (Buckingham Street)
1946/06/26 (Route 707)
Service started 707: OXTED Station – Tatsfield – Chelsham – Sanderstead – Warlingham – Selsdon – Croydon – Thornton Heath Pond – Streatham – Brixton – Stockwell – London (Victoria) – Marble Arch – Kilburn – Cricklewood – Colindale – Edgware – Stanmore – Bushey – Watford – Kings Langley – Two Waters – Berkhamsted – Tring – AYLESBURY (Buckingham Street)
1948/05/19 (Route 708)
Certain journeys diverted away from Lingfield to run direct via Eastbourne Road
1948/06/09 (Route 706)
Journeys diverted to run double via Tatsfield
1949/03/02 (Route 708)
All journeys operate via Lingfield
1952/02/01 (Route 708)
10T10 to RF (EG [East Grinstead] and HH [Hemel Hempstead])
1952/04/03–10 (Routes 706 and 707)
10T10 to RF (CM [Chelsham])
1952/04/10 (Routes 706 and 707)
10T10 to RF (TG [Tring])
1953/06/02 (many routes)
Coronation Day — many routes split in London, several to finish at off-route terminals
1958/05/05 (all routes)
Bus strike started
1958/05/14 (planned for Route 707)
Planned date (but during bus strike) of start of diversion of some journeys to double-run via Tatsfield
1958/06/20 (all routes)
Bus strike ended
1959/09/27 (many routes)
Eccleston Bridge completely closed for reconstruction; all coaches diverted via Elizabeth Bridge until 1961/05/03
1961/05/03 (many routes)
Coaches resumed using Eccleston Bridge following reconstruction started 1959/09/27
1965/09/26 (many routes)
Victoria area one-way traffic scheme made Eccleston Bridge one way northbound; southbound coaches stop in Buckingham Palace Road
1965/10/03 (Route 707)
Extended from Oxted to Holland, Coldshott on Sundays
1965/10/30 (Route 709)
Last day of ‘Express’ operation
1966/07/10 (Route 706)
Extended on summer Saturdays and Sundays to CHARTWELL
1967/03/25 (Route 706)
Summer extension to Chartwell now operates on Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday
1967/12/30 (Route 708)
RF to RMC
1968/06/09 (Routes 706 and 707)
Last day of Sunday operation on service 707 between Chelsham and Holland (remainder of Sunday service from Aylesbury to Chelsham operated as route 706)
1969/02/14 (Route 707)
Last day of operation
1969/02/15 (Route 706)
Converted to O.M.O., revised to operate Aylesbury – Chelsham, extended Monday to Friday peak hours to Westerham (double running to Tatsfield in direction of peak only). Summer Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday service to Chartwell continues to operate, but not via Tatsfield
1969/02/15 (Route 708)
Converted to O.M.O.
1970/01/01 (all routes)
Under the Transport (London) Act, 1969, the Country Bus and Coach section of London Transport passed to a new company, London Country Bus Services, a subsidiary of the National Bus Company
1973/04–05 (Route 706)
RF to LNC (TG [Tring])
1973/12/15 (Route 708)
RF to SNC (EG [East Grinstead] and HH [Hemel Hempstead])
1975/10/03 (Route 706)
RF to SNC (CM [Chelsham])
1976/09/30 (Route 706)
Last day of operation to Chartwell
1977/04/01 (Route 706)
Last day of operation
1977/04/02 (Route 708)
Extended from Hemel Hempstead Bus Station to Aylesbury to replace 706
1977/11/19 (Route 708)
Certain journeys diverted to run via Brent Cross Shopping Centre weekdays
1978/04/01 (Route 708)
Curtailed to operate between Aylesbury and Victoria with certain weekday journeys running via Brent Cross Shopping Centre
1978/04/01 (Route 719)
Revised to operate between Hemel Hempstead and East Grinstead via Kingsbury, Victoria thence via former service 708
1979/04/28 (Route 706)
New service 706: Tunbridge Wells West Station – Victoria via former route 704; certain Sunday journeys operate via Knockholt Pound
1979/10/27 (Route 719)
Revised to operate between Hemel Hempstead and Victoria via Kingsbury; end of cross-London running, started 1930/12/10

Green Line Maps, 1928 to 1930

The first two maps (for 1928–1929 and for 1930) show the actual routes in operation at that time, and the potential radial routes that eventually emerged. The third map shows the companies and roads used in central London.


Green Line Map, Central London, 1928 to 1929

Green Line Map, 1930

Green Line Map, Central London, 1928 to 1930